Household Prepper Pantry

Prepper Pantry. The first thought that’s probably popping into peoples heads right now is that I’m some kind of nut job prepping for an end of the world diseaster. Not really, I just prefer being ready for situations which could affect me in real life. The outbreak of #Coronavirus that hit the world should be proof of this. Rather than stick to normality, people started panic buying like complete idiots. Exhausting supplies and generally fighting over common goods.

Anyone who knows me, knows I’m a prepper. People I worked with used to have a laugh about it, but they always knew I was the one person who would probably have it. So the jokes kind of died down after a while. I wanted to have a realistic “pantry” so that if needed I could effectively not leave the house for a few months and avoid things until things calm down.

Now, in reality. Prepping is a thing EVERYONE shold do. This pantry is for real life emergencies. What about a job loss. Anything could happen, you could be struck down with an illness, or injury where you can’t afford to work. If you’re self-employed then you may struggle to find money for the bare essentials. What about power cuts, flooding, snow storms? – All these can happen in the UK (especially flooding) and cut off the supplies you desperately need to make life normal again.

Prepping is just a way of life for people, people who save up for xmas are preppers. Or women who buy extra nappies/calpol for their children so they always have some. Just the word springs to mind the kind of stuff Americans do when they’re gearing up for a fall out or nuclear apocalypse. That’s not me. Last thing you want is stress.

On with the show. As mentioned I’m prepping for natural things which can affect me in every day life. I don’t want to panic into getting supplies I need at the last minute as this is when you start thinking irrationally. The reason I’m also creating this is because I hate bloody looking for things. Batteries, light bulbs, packing tape etc. I just want one place for everything I’d normally use over time

I’m slowly adding to the collection by buying a bit extra when I go shopping each time. The supplies I buy are designed to be things I’d normally get on a normal shopping trip, but there in “reserve” if suddenly they’re not available, or I find myself in financial difficulty or unable to get to a store. It costs me maybe an extra an extra £10-15 per week ontop of my normal shopping budget allowed me to slowly collect supplies. I live alone so don’t generally bother anyone or have a need to go out unless I need food

The pantry room is a small cupboard (approx 94″ Height x 45″ Width x 35″ Depth). Approx 2400 litres or 85 cubic feet. Not much but it holds the essentials I need. That I tend to buy/use all the time. It’s not stocked currently, but I’m slowly adding to it. As you can see it’s a mixture of everything, cleaning products, food, drink, toiletries. Like I said, prepping for real life. I have a set of drawers in there which helps keep my bedroom empty and allows me to store items in a logical manner. Any toiletries are kept in a basket. I plan on putting up shelving to implement a FIFO system with the stock.

In the cupboard is as follows. I’m always adding to it. Before you think I’m selfish, this is my insurance policy for job losses, or any situations where I’m struggling for food/money. I also have a family, I give to them if they need the supplies. Nothing will be wasted, it will always be given away if I won’t end up using it

People are going to judge me for posting this anyway, but I don’t particularly care. I’ve been in situations where I was counting every single penny and stressing about my next meal. I’m now fortunate enough that I can start affording to build up my pantry and protect myself in the future so I don’t make bad decisions

I highly recommend people start building up a pantry and learn the rotation. Even if you can only afford an extra £2-3 per week, think how much extra supplies you could get over the course of a year with another £100-150 worth of money in your back pocket

CURRENT “PANTRY”

This is the current picture. I might add a gallery over time to show how it’s been built up. The drawers currently hold clothes, but eventually I plan on using these to seperate items further. One for cleaning products etc

Prepper Pantry
  • TINNED FOOD
    • 4 x 300G Baked Beans
    • 1 x Hot Dogs
    • 1 x Stewed Steak
    • 1 x Rice Pudding
  • FLUIDS
    • 1 x 12 Pack of 500ml Water
    • 2 x 680ml Rowse Honey
  • TOILETRIES
    • 1 x Pack of Tooth Paste
    • 1 x 18 Pack of Toilet Rolls
    • 2 x 4 Pack of Bath Soap
  • CLEANING
    • 2 x Bin Bag Rolls
    • 1 x 4 Pack Kitchen Rolls
    • 1 x Bottle of White Vineger
  • GENERAL SUPPLIES
    • 2 x Aluminium Foil Rolls

I still have lots more I want to buy, I’ll slowly add to this over time

In case you’re wondering. The total cost of all these supplies will probably be in the range of £400 when finished. Over the course of 1 year, this will cost me an extra £7.69 per week in shopping. Not really much when you think of it. All essentials that I can use and it gives me a huge safety net should I need to stay in the house for a while. It’s kept nice and tidy out of the way inside a cupboard that doesn’t interfere with my life. Supplies are always at hand though

A breakdown of all the supplies and how much I’ve spent

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Pay calculator for financial management

One of the things I did when taking control of my financial expenditure and budgeting my money was created an Excel spreadsheet. I used this as a Pay Calculator for my financial management. It helps when you’re tracking every single penny you spend, because you can see all the figures at a glance. Where you’re spending too much, where you aren’t spending enough. Where you can save.

When filling this file in, you have to be 100% honest, and input every single number. If you’re lucky, you’ll have most things on a direct debit, it makes things easier. If not you have to manually input them into the pay calculator.

Please find attached this Microsoft Excel file. Which you can use for budgeting and sorting out your finances.

http://andrewhope.co.uk/~downloads/wordpress-files/financial-calculator.xls

It’s fairly self explanatory

  • Standard household bills input into the left column
  • Any extra money in right-hand side column
  • Your standard wage / benefits goes in the middle section

The pay calculator will then work out the rest for you, and also show you what money you will have left over for the month.

For me personally credit card / loans where my main issue. I’ve been working on restoring my credit rating so I could get a consolidation loan to free up £100 per month off my wage. It doesn’t seem like much, but when you’re counting pennies and budgeting, an extra £100 that you no longer spending is a hell of a lot of free money to play with. Also I paid off one of my credit cards.

This has helped me with financial freedom, I’m slowly getting there.

Views – 212

money saving – changing bulbs to led

I’m always interested in saving money at home. I’ve known for a while that changing my household LED bulbs would save me some money. I’ve finally finished changing all of the bulbs in the household to LED now, so thought I’d write this article to document the prices. A lot of people who aren’t converted believe LED lighting isn’t good. It’s very good and can produce crystal white light in the house. I’ve also converted my mother to use LED lighting now she has found out how much it saves me.

One of the first things that I tackled was my lighting. Traditional (Halogen) lights in the house are very power hungry, times have changed and modern lighting (LED) is now available, which normally uses around 25% of the power that a “Traditional” light-bulb uses.

A 60W Halogen light uses around 60W in power. An LED equivalent uses around 10-15w in power. It doesn’t seem much, but when you add up how often the lights are used, and apply some basic maths formulas. You realise just how bad your household bills are affected by the smallest change in cost.

You can see in the table below, that over the cost of an entire year the bulbs cost me approximately £1.45 per month to run, compared to £13.88 to run per month. For reference, if you want to Calculate just how much your bulbs cost you over the year, this is the formula below

(W x H x 365)/1000 – Multiplied by electric cost per KW/h

An example bulb (15W LED, that is used for 2 hours per day, but used 90 days of the year)
You can work this out for any number of bulbs, just break it down by each bulb per fitting

15 x 2 x 90 = 2,700W of power – divide this by 1000 to convert to KW/h = 2.7 KW/h
Multiply by your cost of electricity (for me it’s £0.14 per KW/h) – excluding the standing charge
Cost to run this 1 LED for above time period = £0.378 per “year” (2.7 x 0.14)

In total I have spent around £30 to replace all of the bulbs (the ones I buy are from ASDA). As you can see below, the costs are made back within the first year of ownership.

If you also take into account the lifespan of the bulbs (LED – 25,000 hours) vs (Halogen – 1,000 hours). It usually costs you even more because you have to buy more bulbs to replace the Halogen ones as they fail.

Hopefully the information below should help you convert to LED. It’s a great money saving tip and simply adding an extra £2 per month onto your shopping bill buying 1 or 2 bulbs at a time can have a lasting effect for you over the years.

LED Lighting Comparison

ROOMORIGINAL BULB (Wattage)

( ) = Total power usage
NEW BULB
(Wattage)

[ ] = Equivalent power
WATTAGE
SAVING
Approx usage (Hrs/year)

( ) = Hours per day
Annual KW/h

Formula =
(Bulb Power (W) * Hrs per Day * 365) / 1000

( ) = Halogen KW/h
Annual Electric Cost @ 0.14 per kw/h

LED listed

( ) = Halogen Cost
Bedroom 13 x 50W (150W)3 x 5W (15W)
[ 50W ]
135W2920
(8)
43.8 (438)£6.13 (£61.32)
Bedroom 24 x 30W (120W)4 x 3.7W (14.8W)
[ 40W ]
105.2W182.5
(0.5 - 30 Min)
2.701 (21.9)£0.37 (£3.06)
Bathroom1 x 20W (20W)1 x 9.4W (9.4W)
[60W ]
10.6W365
(1)
3.431 (7.3)£0.48 (£1.02)
Landing3 x 50W (150W)3 x 5W (15W)
[ 50W ]
135W365
(1)
5.475 (54.75)£0.76 (£7.66)
Stairs3 x 30W (90W)3 x 5W (15W)
[ 50W ]
75W365
(1)
5.475 (54.75)£0.76 (£7.66)
Kitchen (Main)4 x 50W (200W)4 x 5W (20W)
[ 50W ]
180W1095
(3)
21.9 (219)£3.06 (£30.66)
Kitchen (Sink)3 x 40W (120W)3 x 2.9W (8.7W)
[ 40W ]
101.3W730
(2)
6.351 (87.6)£0.88 (£12.26)
Living Room4 x 50W (200W)4 x 5W (20W)
[ 50W ]
180W1460
(4)
29.2 (292)£4.08 (£40.88)
Rear Door1 x 20W (20W)1 x 9.4W (9.4W)
[ 60W ]
10.6W182.5
(0.5 - 30 Min)
3.431 (7.3)£0.48 (£1.02)
Downstairs Toilet1 x 20W (20W)1 x 9.4W (9.4W)
[ 60W ]
10.6W182.5
(0.5 - 30 Min)
3.431 (7.3)£0.48 (£1.02)
TOTAL£17.48 (£166.56)
PER MONTH£1.45 (£13.88)

Views – 208