Tag: golf mk5

Broken rear spring

Broken rear spring

Through the joys of wear & tear and British weather, about to drive to work when my rear spring failed on the car. Luckily, I was just driving off the kerb about to head to work when I heard a loud bang. Immediately reversed back onto the kerb because I knew what that sound was.

Looked on the path and spotted little bits of metal, looked at the arch and it had greatly dropped so knew the spring was gone. I looked under the car with my torch and could see the beam sitting on the spring although didn’t look like it had snapped.

I called my brother and in between him coming over to look I fished about under where the spring sits and found the other part of it… Yep, definately broke!

spring-beam
Hmmm, maybe not too bad
snapped-spring
Nope, I was wrong!

Now, that I knew the spring was broken, there was definately no way of me being able to get into work at 10pm on a Thursday night. So I just called in and said I wasn’t coming in. Pointless trying really and no way was I driving my car.

I decided to have an early night and get up early. I went to Durham and purchased 2 new springs from Eurocarparts (made by Anschler for around £30 each). Have to buy them in pairs otherwise the extra load effects the opposite side and eventually breaks it. The springs will be replaced and a write it will be added to the main site. Fingers crossed this is the last wear and tear part I have to replace for a while

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Seized piston on brake caliper

Seized piston on brake caliper

After having my brakes inspected at the garage due to heavy vibrations when I was accelerating / braking. I suspected a warped brake disc or wheel balancing issue

 

My brother informed me that the piston was seized on my drivers side brake caliper at the front and it would need replacing. This was causing excessive heat when driving and was the cause of the over heating brake pads and vibrations that I felt.

 

I purchased some replacement brake pads and discs for my car from KNS and a new caliper for a total of £135.39 after giving them my cars registration, talk about a nightmare day

 

Me and my brother went through early morning to replace the discs and pads, the discs were 100% the right fitment because the part number on them matched a previous set I had bought.

 

We were unable to check the caliper was right until fitment, but visually inspecting it turned out to be correct. One comment I mentioned was I hope they gave me the right brake pads…. oh low behold me and my bad luck. They weren’t the right pads, they were for my model of car, but not my model of vehicle.

 

The pads for my car used different types of lugs to hold them in place on the caliper, they’re ones which point down, where the pads I was given were more slot in. I think the pads were for the 110HP model and mine is the 140 as they’re also smaller than the ones I currently use

 

Basically I had to do a trip to a local car parts store, which luckily is open 7 days per week. Get there early morning with my existing calipers and compared them against the ones I purchased and they were an exact match…. this is exactly the reason why I’m very awkward about VW, if you get the wrong gear your fubar’d

 

Anyway, in returning back, Steven had already changed the caliper, luckily and the new pads were correct (albeit, didn’t have ABS wear sensor, but a dummy wire was fitted so it didn’t trip the warning alarm).

 

At a later date I’ll order some parts from a site I’ve used before “Brake parts superstore”. I’ll be rebuilding my existing caliper as a spare for a Youtube Video and Article for the website and posting further detail in the brake article

Views – 1102

Timing belt replacement

Timing belt replacement

Low and behold, after owning the car that had a lowly 32,000 miles on it when I first purchased and “Full” VWSH, my car was approaching the 80,000 mile limit for timing belt replacement

Normally I go through around 1,000 miles per month and at current mileage it would be around summer next year when it needed replacement but I decided to carry out the timing belt replacement early as I’m expecting this winter to be a cold one and don’t want extra strain on the vehicle during the snow. The current mileage on the vehicle is 73,472 before the timing belt replacement. Which means my next one shouldn’t really be due until 140-150,000 miles

One of the main factors I wanted was using genuine parts (ideally) for the replacement. After market parts are generally the same as manufacturers parts just without the stamp on them, but I’d prefer knowing I’m using the genuine kit so I know what I’m getting on the vehicle when it’s repaired.

It took me a while to select someone to carry out the timing belt replacement on my Golf, because I’m fussy. Use the wrong grade of antifreeze or miss changing important parts and your engine is knackered.

Rather than take it to a dealer, I decided to have it carried out at a specialist. After a lot of searching and a LONG email trail (sorry Ben), I decided to have the work carried out at Darcys Garage a VW specialist in County Durham. Their tech worked for Audi for 10 years so has experience working with this vehicle.

The total quote I received for replacement of the following parts was around £400. For one major component on the car, I wasn’t fussed about spending more money. I don’t like “cheap” always when it comes to cars

The job was carried out after dropping the car off early in the morning and finished around 4 hrs later.

The following parts were replaced with genuine VW gear

  • Water pump (the ORIGINAL has a plastic impellor, and so does the genuine one), hopefully I won’t get the common impellor issues, my original one lasted until 75,000 so fingers crossed
  • Timing belt. This included the belt and all tensioners
  • Antifreeze – I don’t know what, but I’m assumming it was correct grade that suits VW spec. I think mine is G80 or G80++
  • Alternator belt

Total price came to £385

The car didn’t feel any different when driving it, how it stands up will only show test of time. If anything fails I’ll be certainly taking it back to the garage to be inspected as the original equipment should last me for the next 7-8 years.

At the moment I’m happy with the work received and will recommend Darcy’s garage as it was friendly, fast and great value for money. My car will stand the test of time to find out.

 

Only downside is the car parking, is VERY limited

I’ll be posting a more in-depth information on my website, including pictures of the equipment and part numbers used. I couldn’t keep the original water pump as it had to go to VW, but it seemed to be in very good condition, no issues with it detaching from the impellor spline. Tried to get a pic but my phone was up the duff.

 

 

Views – 1066

VW Golf MK5 Broken Spring

VW Golf MK5 Broken Spring

Starting my car this morning and tuning a junction highlighted a horrible sound which instantly occured on my car this morning which immediately made me suspect a my VW Golf had a broken spring

 

Turning full lock left to right on the car made a horrible clunking noise which can also be engine mounts or the steering rack moving in it’s mounts.

 

My brother had a better look for me when he got home. Turned out I was right in first instant the spring was broken, pictures to follow to show the damage.

 

As I had work on nightshift the following day, I decided I needed a replacement asap as the car wasn’t driveable. I previously had my opposite spring replaced for the MOT 6 months prior. I should have replaced both, because they usually should be replaced in pairs (when one gets replaced, eventually the other will go, because it’s “weaker”)

 

Needless to say around 6000 miles later my other spring decided to go. My car is a 140HP – GT TDI model but it turns out you can fit the standard springs (luckily) the GT TDI ones are harder to find at short notice unless you go pay a stealership for one.

 

£31 later and I had a replacement spring available, my brother collected all the tools and he did the job himself, thank god for having a car mechanic as an older brother.

 

Personally, I wouldn’t attempt this job myself, I’d take it to a garage unless you’re feeling lucky. I imagine it’s possible, but my brother ended up removing the entire suspension strut and putting the spring on this way. Even with all the tools available it still took him two hours and a lot of help from me. He ended up having to expand the nuts with heat because they were turning on the locktite threads being a PITA.

 

Anyway, job done and car responding much better. I think he deserves another pressie for car repair from me soon. He’s been hampering for a Clarke coil spring compressing set for ages, so I might get him it to add to his kit.

CHT747 Coil Spring Kit

Views – 4212